What Scope Levels Available For Dimensions And Metrics

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Last Updated on August 3, 2022 by Stanley Sanchez

There are four scope levels available for dimensions and metrics: data source, hit, product, and session. The data source scope level applies filters to all of the data in a report suite. The hit scope level filters only the hits associated with a particular dimension or metric.

The product scope level filters only the activity generated by a specific product. Finally, the session scope level filters only the activity from a single visit.

There are four scope levels available for dimensions and metrics: product, hit, session, and user. The default scope is hit-level, which means that the dimension or metric will be applied to each individual hit. If you want a dimension or metric to apply to an entire session or user, you will need to set the appropriate scope level.

What Scope Levels Available For Dimensions And Metrics

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What are the 4 Scopes of Google Analytics?

Google Analytics is a web analytics tool that helps you track, analyze, and report your website traffic. It can be used to track any type of online activity, from e-commerce transactions to social media interactions. There are four main scopes of Google Analytics: user-level, session-level, hit-level, and product-level.

User-level scope refers to the data that is associated with a specific user ID. This data includes information such as demographics, interests, and behaviors. Session-level scope refers to the data that is associated with a specific session ID.

This data includes information such as pageviews, session duration, and bounce rate. Hit-level scope refers to the data that is associated with a specific hit ID. This data includes information such as page URL, page title, referral source, and keywords.

Product-level scope refers to the data that is associated with a specific product ID. This data includes information such as product name, price point, and category.

What are Dimensions And Metrics?

Dimensions and metrics are two essential concepts in data analysis. Dimensions are the characteristics of your data, while metrics are the measurements you can take on those dimensions. For example, if you’re looking at website traffic data, a dimension might be the source of the traffic (such as organic search or paid ads), while a metric might be the number of pageviews or unique visitors.

Both dimensions and metrics are important for understanding your data, but they serve different purposes. Dimensions help you to understand what your data is telling you, while metrics provide numerical insights that can help you to make decisions about your business.

What Scope Would Be Set for a Custom Dimension That Reports?

Assuming you are referring to Google Analytics scope settings for custom dimensions, there are four options: 1) Hit-level scope: This means that the dimension value will be associated with the specific hit (pageview, event, etc.) in which it was set. So, if a user visits three pages on your site and you have a hit-level custom dimension set for each page, then that user will generate three separate dimension values – one for each page.

This is generally the most granular option. 2) Session-level scope: This means that the dimension value will be associated with all hits within the same session. So, using the same example as above, if a user visits three pages on your site and you have a session-level custom dimension set, then that user will generate onedimension value that will be applied to all hits within that session (pageviews, events, etc.).

3) User-level scope: This means that the dimension value will be associated with all hits generated by that particular user over time. So, using the same example as above, if a user visits three pages on your site and you have a user-level custom dimension set, then that user will generate onedimension value that will be applied to all of their hits across all sessions (pageviews, events, etc.). This is generally the least granular option.

4) Product-level scope: This means that the dimension value will be associated with a specific product within your ecommerce system. So, if you have an online store with multiple products and you want to track which products are being viewed or purchased by users, you would use a product-level custom dimension.

What Scope Applies to Custom Metrics Answer?

There are two types of custom metrics: metric filters and log group metrics. Metric filters are used to search for and match terms, phrases, or values in your log data. Log group metrics are used to aggregate numerical data from your logs.

The scope of a custom metric depends on the type of metric. For metric filters, the scope is limited to the log group that the filter was created in. For log group metrics, the scope is determined by the aggregation function that you choose when you create the metric.

Some aggregation functions have a global scope, which means that they will aggregate data across all log groups in your account. Other aggregation functions have a regional scope, which means that they will only aggregate data from log groups within the region where the function is run. To ensure that your custom metrics are accurate and reflect all of the data in your account, it’s important to understand which type of metric you’re working with and what scope applies to it.

【 Answers 】 What scope levels available for dimensions and metrics? – ServiceCentreList.com

What is a “Metric” in Google Analytics?

Google Analytics defines a metric as “a quantitative measure of user behavior on your website.” In other words, metrics are the numbers that tell you how your website is performing. Google Analytics provides many default metrics, such as pageviews, unique visitors, and bounce rate.

You can also create custom metrics to track specific actions on your website. To create a custom metric in Google Analytics, go to Admin > View > Custom Definitions > Custom Metrics. Click the “+ New Custom Metric” button and enter the details of your metric, such as its name, scope (hit or product), and format (integer or currency).

Once you’ve created your custom metric, you can add it to any report in Google Analytics. There are four types of metrics in Google Analytics: 1) Pageview Metrics: These tell you how often a page on your site is viewed.

The most popular pageview metric is unique pageviews, which counts the number of times a given page is viewed during a single session. 2) Engagement Metrics: Engagement metrics show how users interact with your site after landing on it. Common engagement metrics include bounce rate (the percentage of visitors who leave after viewing only one page) and time on site (the average amount of time spent on a site).

3) Conversion Metrics: Conversion metrics show how well your site converts visitors into leads or customers. The most common conversion metric is goal conversion rate, which measures the percentage of visitors who complete a specified goal (such as filling out a contact form). 4) Ecommerce Metrics: Ecommerce metrics track sales and revenue generated from your online store.

Common ecommerce metrics include transactions, revenue per transaction, and cart abandonment rate (the percentage of shoppers who add items to their cart but don’t complete the purchase).

Conclusion

There are four scope levels available for dimensions and metrics: product, session, user, and hit. Product scope pertains to data that is specific to a certain product or service. Session scope encompasses data associated with a customer’s interactions with your site or app during a single visit or session.

User scope refers to data that is specific to an individual user. Finally, hit scope encompasses all the data collected during a request made to the Google Analytics servers.

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